AGGRENOX is a prescription medication used to lower the risk of stroke in people who have had a "mini-stroke" (transient ischemic attack or TIA) or stroke due to a blood clot.

Helpful Resources

As with any health condition, it is important to keep yourself informed about TIA/stroke. That way, you have the information and motivation you need to partner with your doctor and do your part to help manage your risk of a subsequent stroke.

The links below are provided to help you learn more about stroke, keep you up-to-date on new developments, and give you helpful information and tips.

Resources for learning and support

American Heart Association The AHA is a national voluntary health agency. This site includes stories of hope, current news, brochures about heart and stroke issues, as well as consumer and patient education materials. Its main mission is to reduce disability and death from cardiovascular diseases and stroke.

American Stroke Association A division of the American Heart Association, the ASA offers in-depth information on stroke, current news, stroke care programs, and educational materials, and provides access to other publications and resources.

National Center for Health Statistics A part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, this site has the most current statistics for stroke in the United States.

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke NINDS, a division of the National Institutes of Health, provides a Stroke Information Guide for patients, as well as links to other health organizations and government agencies.

National Stroke Association As a leading resource for stroke patients, the NSA provides resources for stroke through education, services, and community-based activities in prevention, with information on treatment, rehabilitation, and recovery. The NSA also offers a helpful booklet filled with practical information and advice on how to take charge of your stroke recovery or support someone else through recovery. Download HOPE: A Stroke Recovery Guide now

In addition to these organizations, there are many well-written, informative books on stroke and TIA that may be helpful. Check your local library or bookstore—or favorite online bookseller—to see what's out there.

Resources for caregivers

Caregiver Action Network Founded by 2 caregivers in 1993, this website offers resources for caregivers as well as resources that can help you connect with other caregivers and get involved in volunteer and advocacy efforts.

National Alliance for Caregiving As a national, nonprofit coalition of organizations, the National Alliance for Caregiving (NAC) brings together a range of caregiver organizations from professional and service organizations to a government agency and corporations. The website offers information about research, legislation, and how to get involved.

Family Caregiver Alliance The first community-based nonprofit organization for caregiver needs, the Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) offers in-depth information on public policy, research, and caregiving as well as links to publications and support groups.

Today's Caregiver Magazine Today's Caregiver was the first national magazine dedicated to caregivers and its content is created by caregivers themselves. The website offers newsletters, online discussion lists, chat rooms, and more.

Next:  Video Library

Learn about AGGRENOX

Find out how many patients in a clinical study remained stroke-free over 2 years.

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Stroke and TIA Stories

Find out how others are reducing
their risk of a
subsequent
stroke.

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Save on AGGRENOX

You may be eligible for $0 co-pays with the AGGRENOX Co-Pay Card.

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The Taking Smart Steps™ program

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Insights for caregivers

Caring for someone after a stroke can be difficult.

Get info and advice that may help

Savings and support

Find out about savings on AGGRENOX and FREE support programs.

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Insight for caregivers

Get information tailored to those who are caring for someone who has experienced a stroke or TIA.

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Helpful resources

Learn more about stroke and what you can do to reduce your risk with these resources.

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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Aggrenox® (aspirin/extended-release dipyridamole) 25 mg/200 mg capsules is a prescription medicine used to lower the risk of stroke in people who have had a "mini-stroke" (transient ischemic attack or TIA) or stroke due to a blood clot.

AGGRENOX should be avoided in patients who are allergic to any ingredient in AGGRENOX, or allergic to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or who have the combination of asthma, runny nose, and nasal polyps. AGGRENOX should not be given to a child or teenager.

AGGRENOX increases the risk of bleeding, including bleeding into the brain, stomach or intestines. Any bleeding you have may take longer to stop when you are taking AGGRENOX.

AGGRENOX should be avoided by patients with a history of stomach ulcers or those who drink three or more alcoholic drinks a day, as these can increase the risk of bleeding. Patients should tell their doctor about all medicines they are taking, especially blood thinners, heparin, warfarin, NSAIDs, heart medicines, or medicines for high blood pressure, including diuretics ("water pills").

AGGRENOX should be avoided during pregnancy, especially in the third trimester. AGGRENOX should be avoided in patients with severe liver or kidney problems. The most common side effects of AGGRENOX are headache, upset stomach, and diarrhea.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.
Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Click here for full Prescribing Information including Patient Information.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

EXPAND SAFETY INFORMATION

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Aggrenox® (aspirin/extended-release dipyridamole) 25 mg/200 mg capsules is a prescription medicine used to lower the risk of stroke in people who have had a "mini-stroke" (transient ischemic attack or TIA) or stroke due to a blood clot.

AGGRENOX should be avoided in patients who are allergic to any ingredient in AGGRENOX, or allergic to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or who have the combination of asthma, runny nose, and nasal polyps. AGGRENOX should not be given to a child or teenager.

AGGRENOX increases the risk of bleeding, including bleeding into the brain, stomach or intestines. Any bleeding you have may take longer to stop when you are taking AGGRENOX.

AGGRENOX should be avoided by patients with a history of stomach ulcers or those who drink three or more alcoholic drinks a day, as these can increase the risk of bleeding. Patients should tell their doctor about all medicines they are taking, especially blood thinners, heparin, warfarin, NSAIDs, heart medicines, or medicines for high blood pressure, including diuretics ("water pills").

AGGRENOX should be avoided during pregnancy, especially in the third trimester. AGGRENOX should be avoided in patients with severe liver or kidney problems. The most common side effects of AGGRENOX are headache, upset stomach, and diarrhea.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.
Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Click here for full Prescribing Information including Patient Information.